Gray Spiders

Of the 39 species found in our database, the following include the color gray. It's important to note that spiders exhibit quite a bit of individual variation in color and pattern sometimes. Also, in order to grow, spiders must shed their exoskeleton in a process called "ecdysis" or "molting." After that process, a spider may permanently change in color, or may be temporarily discolored while the new exoskeleton is still fresh. Please keep those possibilities in mind when using the color filter.

Spider Species with the Color Gray

Male Adult Male
Male Agelenopsis spp. spider
Female Adult Female
Female Agelenopsis spp. spider

Agelenopsis spp.
(Grass Spiders)

Summary

“Grass Spiders” are represented by 13 species collectively found throughout most of the U.S. and southern Canada, and northern Mexico. Like all members of the funnel weaver family Agelenidae, they spin dense, non-sticky, sheet-like webs with a funnel-like retreat where the spider hides.

Male Adult Male
Male Castianeira longipalpa spider
Female Adult Female
Female Castianeira longipalpa spider

Castianeira longipalpa
(Ant Mimic Spider)

Summary

This strikingly patterned species is a wandering hunter, often catching prey at night as well as during the day. They live close to the ground, under rocks and logs or in leaf litter, but are also occasionally found on (or in) buildings. Their movements are often ant-like, earning them the nickname “antmimic.”

Male Adult Male
Male Cheiracanthium mildei spider
Female Adult Female
Female Cheiracanthium mildei spider

Cheiracanthium mildei
(Longlegged Sac Spider)

Summary

“Longlegged Sac Spiders” are pale green, tan, or yellow nocturnal hunting spiders with very long front legs. Native to southern Europe, this spider has made its way into North America, where it is now fairly widespread. It is commonly found indoors, where it prowls walls and ceilings at night, looking for prey or mates.

Male Adult Male
Male Dolomedes tenebrosus spider
Female Adult Female
Female Dolomedes tenebrosus spider

Dolomedes tenebrosus
(Dark Fishing Spider)

Summary

These very large, sprawling arachnids are most often found on vertical surfaces: tree trunks, fence posts, bridge pilings, or the exterior walls of buildings, usually at night. There, they wait in ambush for large insects to come within striking distance. They do not spin webs to catch prey, but simply overpower their victims.

Male Adult Male
Male Dysdera crocata spider
Female Adult Female
Female Dysdera crocata spider

Dysdera crocata
(Woodlouse Hunter)

Summary

Native to Europe, and now widespread across the globe, this brightly colored spider is hard to miss. The long jaws and fangs are used to stab or turn over its prey: land isopods like sowbugs and roly-polies. This species does not spin a web, but hunts “on foot,” sometimes straying indoors.

Male Adult Male
Male Herpyllus ecclesiasticus spider
Female Adult Female
Female Herpyllus ecclesiasticus spider

Herpyllus ecclesiasticus
(Eastern Parson Spider)

Summary

This a hunting spider that does not spin a web to capture prey. It gets its common name from the black and white color pattern reminiscent of the garb worn by old-time clergymen. Common east of the Rocky Mountains, it sometimes strays indoors in the course of prowling for a meal or seeking a mate.

Male Adult Male
Male Hogna carolinensis spider
Female Adult Female
Female Hogna carolinensis spider

Hogna carolinensis
(Carolina Wolf Spider)

Summary

This species is the largest “wolf spider” in North America. Females reach 22-35 millimeters in body length. Their legspan is greater still. This spider may hunt actively at night, or wait in ambush at the mouth of its burrow, where it hides during the day. Adult males may wander indoors during mating season.

Male Adult Male
Male Kukulcania hibernalis spider
Female Adult Female
Female Kukulcania hibernalis spider

Kukulcania hibernalis
(Southern House Spider)

Summary

This species is often associated with human habitations, spreading its web from cracks and crevices on the exterior of homes, barns, and other structures. Males are frequently mistaken for recluse spiders (genus Loxosceles). The females may live up to eight years.

Male Adult Male
Male Menemerus bivittatus spider
Female Adult Female
Female Menemerus bivittatus spider

Menemerus bivittatus
(Gray Wall Jumper)

Summary

This species is native to the Old World tropics, but has ridden cargo to many other tropical and subtropical places around the globe. Look for these jumping spiders almost exclusively on the exterior walls of buildings here in the U.S. They are active hunters during the day and spend the night hidden away in crevices.

Male Adult Male
Male Neoscona crucifera spider
Female Adult Female
Female Neoscona crucifera spider

Neoscona crucifera
(Spotted Orbweaver)

Summary

This species is relatively variable in color and sometimes pattern, but is most commonly seen sporting a rusty-red or golden orange color. The orb-shaped web is very large and is often constructed on buildings and other man-made structures, especially near outdoor lights. This species is most conspicuous in late summer and early fall.

Male Adult Male
Male Olios giganteus spider
Female Adult Female
Female Olios giganteus spider

Olios giganteus
(Giant Crab Spider)

Summary

This relatively large species lives in arid, desert ecosystems. They are nocturnal and like to prowl vertical surfaces like shrubs, trees, and the exterior walls of buildings. They do not spin a web to catch prey, but easily overpower most insects.

Male Adult Male
Male Parasteatoda tepidariorum spider
Female Adult Female
Female Parasteatoda tepidariorum spider

Parasteatoda tepidariorum
(Common House Spider)

Summary

This species is abundant and widespread across the entire world, and is closely associated with buildings and other man-made structures. The teardrop-shaped, papery brown egg sacs can aid in their identification. The spider’s color and body shape cause them to be mistaken for “brown widows” on occasion.

Male Adult Male
Male Pholcus phalangioides spider
Female Adult Female
Female Pholcus phalangioides spider

Pholcus phalangioides
(Longbodied Cellar Spider)

Summary

The Longbodied Cellar Spider is thought to be native to Europe, but can be found globally after having traveled nearly everywhere as a stowaway in commerce. Their long, thin legs and elongated abdomen make them relatively easy to identify. Find them on ceilings, in basements, storage sheds, old wells, caves, and other dry locations with low light.

Male Adult Male
Male Platycryptus undatus spider
Female Adult Female
Female Platycryptus undatus spider

Platycryptus undatus
(Tan Jumping Spider)

Summary

These jumping spiders are frequently seen patrolling the outer walls of buildings and other vertical surfaces, looking for bugs to pounce on. The mottled gray, black, and white scalloped pattern on their abdomen makes them one of the easier spiders to identify in the field.

Male Adult Male
Male Scotophaeus blackwalli spider
Female Adult Female
Female Scotophaeus blackwalli spider

Scotophaeus blackwalli
(Mouse Spider)

Summary

This is a synanthropic European species that was accidentally introduced to some parts of North America. It runs in fast starts-and-stops and has a soft and fuzzy appearance, earning it the nickname “Mouse Spider.” They are mostly found in and around buildings where they stalk insects at night.

Male Adult Male
Male Tegenaria domestica spider
Female Adult Female
Female Tegenaria domestica spider

Tegenaria domestica
(Barn Funnel Weaver)

Summary

Today, this species occurs nearly everywhere people live, having spread with international commerce. The sheet-like webs of this spider are conspicuous in dark corners of barns, cellars, sheds, garages, cabins, and other man-made structures. Adult males frequently get caught in bathtubs or sinks at night.

Male Adult Male
Male Trachelas tranquillus spider
Female Adult Female
Female Trachelas tranquillus spider

Trachelas tranquillus
(Broad-faced Sac Spider)

Summary

This species is a wandering hunter that may be encountered indoors on occasion and is often referred to as the “Broadfaced Sac Spider.” Normally lives in leaf litter, under bark, or in curled leaves, where it hides by day and emerges at night to prowl for insects. Often confused with the “Woodlouse Hunter,” but lacks the long jaws of that species.

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