Red Spiders

Of the 39 species found in our database, the following include the color red. It's important to note that spiders exhibit quite a bit of individual variation in color and pattern sometimes. Also, in order to grow, spiders must shed their exoskeleton in a process called "ecdysis" or "molting." After that process, a spider may permanently change in color, or may be temporarily discolored while the new exoskeleton is still fresh. Please keep those possibilities in mind when using the color filter.

Spider Species with the Color Red

Male Adult Male
Male Araneus diadematus spider
Female Adult Female
Female Araneus diadematus spider

Araneus diadematus
(Cross Orbweaver)

Summary

This spider is named for the pattern of white spots on the abdomen that form a cross in most specimens. Native to Europe, it was introduced to North America long ago. It spins the classic wheel-like orb web, usually sitting head-down in the hub (center), at night as well as during the day.

Male Adult Male
Male Castianeira longipalpa spider
Female Adult Female
Female Castianeira longipalpa spider

Castianeira longipalpa
(Ant Mimic Spider)

Summary

This strikingly patterned species is a wandering hunter, often catching prey at night as well as during the day. They live close to the ground, under rocks and logs or in leaf litter, but are also occasionally found on (or in) buildings. Their movements are often ant-like, earning them the nickname “antmimic.”

Male Adult Male
Male Dysdera crocata spider
Female Adult Female
Female Dysdera crocata spider

Dysdera crocata
(Woodlouse Hunter)

Summary

Native to Europe, and now widespread across the globe, this brightly colored spider is hard to miss. The long jaws and fangs are used to stab or turn over its prey: land isopods like sowbugs and roly-polies. This species does not spin a web, but hunts “on foot,” sometimes straying indoors.

Male Adult Male
Male Latrodectus mactans spider
Female Adult Female
Female Latrodectus mactans spider

Latrodectus mactans
(Southern Black Widow)

Summary

Mature females are black with a red hourglass on the belly, easily visible as the spider hangs upside down in its web at night. By day, they hide. Immature females have pale stripes and spots, gradually losing those markings as they age. These are shy spiders, and if you avoid placing your hands where you can’t see, bites are unlikely.

Male Adult Male
Male Metaltella simoni spider
Female Adult Female
Female Metaltella simoni spider

Metaltella simoni
(Hacklemesh Weaver)

Summary

This species is native to Argentina, Uruguay, and Brazil but has been introduced to North America via commerce and trade. It is now well-established in the southeastern USA, as well as southern California. Being closely associated with humans, it may occasionally stray indoors.

Male Adult Male
Male Micrathena sagittata spider
Female Adult Female
Female Micrathena sagittata spider

Micrathena sagittata
(Arrowshaped Micrathena)

Summary

The “Arrowshaped Micrathena” is a unique little orbweaver found in the eastern U.S. west to Nebraska and Texas. The shape and coloration of the female make it easily identifiable. The orb web of this species is usually built in low bushes in open deciduous woodlands and along forest edges.

Male Adult Male
Male Misumena vatia spider
Female Adult Female
Female Misumena vatia spider

Misumena vatia
(Goldenrod Crab Spider)

Summary

This spider is an ambush hunter, lying patiently in wait on flowers for an insect to come within striking range. Adult females may be overall yellow or white, with the ability to change back and forth. This species can conquer surprisingly large prey like bees and butterflies.

Male Adult Male
Male Misumenoides formosipes spider
Female Adult Female
Female Misumenoides formosipes spider

Misumenoides formosipes
(Whitebanded Crab Spider)

Summary

This spider waits in ambush on flowers for visiting insects to come within range, seizing a victim in the embrace of its first two pairs of legs. Adult females can change from white to yellow and vice versa, though the change takes some time. Males are very small and strikingly different than females.

Male Adult Male
Male Neoscona crucifera spider
Female Adult Female
Female Neoscona crucifera spider

Neoscona crucifera
(Spotted Orbweaver)

Summary

This species is relatively variable in color and sometimes pattern, but is most commonly seen sporting a rusty-red or golden orange color. The orb-shaped web is very large and is often constructed on buildings and other man-made structures, especially near outdoor lights. This species is most conspicuous in late summer and early fall.

Male Adult Male
Male Parasteatoda tepidariorum spider
Female Adult Female
Female Parasteatoda tepidariorum spider

Parasteatoda tepidariorum
(Common House Spider)

Summary

This species is abundant and widespread across the entire world, and is closely associated with buildings and other man-made structures. The teardrop-shaped, papery brown egg sacs can aid in their identification. The spider’s color and body shape cause them to be mistaken for “brown widows” on occasion.

Male Adult Male
Male Peucetia viridans spider
Female Adult Female
Female Peucetia viridans spider

Peucetia viridans
(Green Lynx Spider)

Summary

This is a relatively large, bright green spider with long, spiny legs and lightning fast movements. They are typically spotted in shrubs and bushes during the day, where they are sit-and-wait predators. Incredibly, this spider is capable of “spitting” venom in self-defense.

Male Adult Male
Male Trachelas tranquillus spider
Female Adult Female
Female Trachelas tranquillus spider

Trachelas tranquillus
(Broad-faced Sac Spider)

Summary

This species is a wandering hunter that may be encountered indoors on occasion and is often referred to as the “Broadfaced Sac Spider.” Normally lives in leaf litter, under bark, or in curled leaves, where it hides by day and emerges at night to prowl for insects. Often confused with the “Woodlouse Hunter,” but lacks the long jaws of that species.

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