Tegenaria domestica (Barn Funnel Weaver)

About Tegenaria domestica

Taxonomic Hierarchy

→ Kingdom: Animalia
→ Phylum: Arthropoda
→ Class: Arachnida
→ Order: Araneae
→ Family: Agelenidae
→ Genus: Tegenaria
→ Species: Tegenaria domestica

Common Name (Official / AAS)

Barn Funnel Weaver

Other Common Names

Lesser European House Spider, Domestic House Spider, Common House Spider, Drain Spider, Funnel Weaver

Author

Author of species name: Carl Alexander Clerck. First year published: 1757, as Araneus domesticus.

Pronunciation

teh-jen-AIR-ee-uh doh-MESS-tih-kuh

Meaning

Tegenaria, in Latinized Greek, translates to “carpet weaver or mat-maker” (Cameron 2005). In Latin, the species name domestica means “of a house or household.”

Notable Previous Names

Tegenaria derhamii

Identifying Traits of Tegenaria domestica

Size

Body length (excluding legs) of adult female ranges from 6-12 mm; adult males range from 6-9 mm.

Female Primary Colors

Male Primary Colors

Eye diagram of Tegenaria domestica

Eyes

Total of eight eyes arranged in two horizontal rows of four. When viewed from the front, the bottom (anterior) row is nearly straight, while the top (posterior) row is arched upwards (procurved).

Legs

Legs somewhat long and of medium thickness (longer in adult males than in females). Some spines and hairs are visible to the naked eye. Legs are light brown with gray or black bands (this species has banded legs; this helps for distinguishing them from Eratigena agrestis and Eratigena atrica). Tip of each leg has 3 claws.

Body

Abdomen is oval-shaped in both genders, though that of the adult male is smaller and more slender. The cephalothorax is pear-shaped and is roughly equal in length to the abdomen (in gravid or well-fed specimens that proportion changes). Cephalothorax is a shiny light brown color with two faded dark stripes that run lengthwise down the middle; there is also a very thin, dark line around the outer margins. Abdomen is grayish brown with a series of pale chevrons running down the center, all the way to the spinnerets. This is often referred to as a “herringbone” pattern. Many other species have it, too.

Range of Tegenaria domestica

Tegenaria domestica can be found in the following states, provinces and territories across the United States and Canada. Our current understanding of each spider's distribution is drawn from numerous scientific publications and online spider submissions, in order to be as accurate as possible. It is important to remember that spiders do not adhere to the territorial lines decided on by humans, therefore these ranges are subject to change.

Important Range Notes

This species was imported into the shipping ports of North America, starting around the 1600s, when large numbers of settlers immigrated here from Europe; it is not native to the area. It is so closely associated with humans that it has likewise been transported to almost every country on Earth, as well.

United States

Canada

Additional Information

Habitat

Extremely common in buildings or other man-made structures; any cellar, barn, or dark corner is fair game for this spider. Also, it can be found outdoors in other sheltered spots, such as in wood piles and under rocks, etc.

Web

Constructs a web characteristic of all members of the family Agelenidae: a funnel-shaped retreat with a radiating flat sheet of webbing. Spider typically remains inside the retreat, motionless, until prey enters the web and it rushes out to grab it.

Season

Mature individuals of either gender can be found at any time of year.

Food

Prey is any insect or other arthropod that the “barn funnel weaver” is able to subdue. They are timid and tend to avoid other spiders as prey, sticking to small and medium-sized insects instead. Since this species lives indoors with humans, you can expect it to be eating all the pest insects that roam around your home.

Lifecycle

Some researchers note that this species is relatively long-lived; females can live 3 to 4 years, though males don’t typically last that long. After mating only once, a female can lay as many as 9 egg sacs before re-mating. She may even spread them apart over a span of two years. The egg sac is mostly lens-shaped and constructed of white silk. It may be attached to the web or away from it, horizontally or vertically; there is great variety. Sometimes debris, such as dirt or prey leftovers, may be attached to the outside of the egg sac.

Pictures of Tegenaria domestica (Barn Funnel Weaver)

General

Female Spiders

Male Spiders

Filtering options are grayed out when we do not have pictures for the given perspective. If you are a spider photographer, you can submit pictures of spiders to help fill any voids in our ever expanding library.
  • Tegenaria domestica
  • Sex: FemaleFemale
  • Maturity: Adult
  • Attributes: Dorsal, Gravid
  • City/Region: Krain
  • State: Washington
  • Country: United States
  • Tegenaria domestica
  • Sex: MaleMale
  • Maturity: Adult
  • Attributes: Dorsal, Webs
  • City/Region: Krain
  • State: Washington
  • Country: United States
  • Tegenaria domestica
  • Sex: FemaleFemale
  • Maturity: Adult
  • Attributes: Dorsal
  • City/Region: Krain
  • State: Washington
  • Country: United States
  • Tegenaria domestica
  • Sex: MaleMale
  • Maturity: Adult
  • Attributes: Dorsal
  • City/Region: Lakewood
  • State: Colorado
  • Country: United States
  • Tegenaria domestica
  • Sex: MaleMale
  • Maturity: Adult
  • Attributes: Dorsal
  • City/Region: Lakewood
  • State: Colorado
  • Country: United States
  • Tegenaria domestica
  • Sex: MaleMale
  • Maturity: Adult
  • Attributes: Eyes
  • City/Region: Lakewood
  • State: Colorado
  • Country: United States

References and Further Reading

Various Research Papers

Scientific Diagrams and Keys for Identification

References for the Casual Reader

Species guide last updated: March 11, 2014

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